Best Crossover

  
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© Provided by Boating These five crossover watersports boats get the job done for boarding, surfing and skiing.

These five crossover watersports boats get the job done for boarding, surfing and skiing. (Courtesy Malibu Boats/)

It is the rare person among us who wants to do one thing and only one thing all the time. Even the professionals who excel at wakesurfing, wakeboarding or water-skiing still enjoy trying their hand at other disciplines. The problem? Each type of boat needs different attributes to help tow-sports enthusiasts enjoy their day on the water. But what if there was one type of boat that could work well for all three? Enter the crossover boat, a style of inboard-powered boat equally capable of flattening the wake for a slalom run, ramping it up for a boarding launch point, or sculpting it for a surf session. Here are five crossover boats to consider. Is one of them right for you? Read on.

Best Crossover© Provided by Boating LOA: 20'0

LOA: 20'0' Beam: 8'2' Fuel Capacity: 38 gal. Dry Weight: 5,843 lb. Seating Capacity: 11 persons (Courtesy Malibu Boats/)

Malibu 20 VTX

Malibu designed the 20 VTX to be a boat that can do it all, calling it the “crossover king.” The key to accomplishing this lies in its hull design, which Malibu calls its Diamond Hull. Specially shaped, it helps generate respectable wakeboard and wakesurf waves, yet still allows for slalom skiing. It is able to offset the displacement needed to generate wakes and waves at slower speeds, with hard reversed chines and lifting strakes to help generate lift at the higher speeds required for water-skiing. In our sea trial of this boat, we noted that without ballast, the boat produced a soft, readily crossable wake at tournament slalom speeds.

Hardcore skiers will want to option for the center-mounted ski pylon and TXi Performance Tower, the mounting geometry of which allows a slalom towline to swing across the cockpit. With the center-mounted ski pylon, the boat will track straight and true while a skier carves through a course.

Time to wakeboard? Deploy Malibu’s Power Wedge III—a hydrofoil that adds a response equal to 1,500 pounds of ballast—and watch the wake grow. The standard ballast system fills to 765 pounds, but you can option the ballast capacity up to 3,575 pounds.

© Provided by Boating Price: $105,690

Price: $105,690 (Courtesy Malibu Boats/)

When the crew is ready to surf, engage Malibu’s Surf Gate—vertically mounted trim tabs that help shape waves—to sculpt the waves to the rider’s preference behind the boat. The waves are clean and long, and can be ridden as long as there’s enough fuel to power Malibu’s proprietary M5Di or M6Di engines.

Key Features

• Power Wedge III hydrofoil creates displacement equivalent to an additional 1,500 pounds of ballast.

• Surf Gate vertically mounted tabs shape the waves for surfing.

• Optional center-mounted ski pylon puts the skier’s pivot point in the cockpit, as found in traditional ski boats.

• Malibu’s Surf Band allows the surfer to adjust the boat’s wave settings while riding behind the boat.

• Fold-down swim step on the swim platform makes it easy to get in and out of the water.

• Command Center touchscreen featuring mOS (Malibu Operating System) has a higher resolution and is even more intuitive.

Malibu Boats - Loudon, Tennessee; 865-458-5478; malibuboats.com

© Provided by Boating LOA: 20'0

LOA: 20'0' Beam: 8'4' Fuel Capacity: 39 gal. Dry Weight: 4,500 lb. Seating Capacity: 12 persons (Courtesy Nautique Boats/)

Nautique Super Air GS20

Many recognized world records in water-skiing have been set behind Ski Nautique models, and the builder’s G Series boats produce excellent wakes for boarding and surfing. For the rider who wants to do it all, even on the same day, Nautique offers the Super Air GS20. In its hull design, the builder features the Nautique Configurable Running Surface (NCRS), which includes an adjustable plate that automatically moves according to user settings in the in-dash Linc Panoray control system. Sensors in the NCRS help it electronically adjust to the ride conditions, similar to auto trim tabs found on many recreational boats.

With that, whoever is driving the Super Air GS20 can flatten the wake for a slalom run behind the boat and use the Linc system to set the boat for pinpoint direction and speed control. Nautique offers a pop-up ski pylon as an option to set the towrope at the lower angle preferred by skiers. (It also serves as a safer towpoint for tubing; we do not recommend using a tower to tow tubers because the angle makes the tube more prone to flying into the air and flipping.)

© Provided by Boating Price: Starts at $110,024

Price: Starts at $110,024 (Courtesy Nautique Boats/)

When you’re ready to surf or board, adjust the NCRS plate in the Linc settings and fill up the 1,850 pounds of internal ballast. While the wake and wave are smaller than those made by pro-level Nautique wakeboats, the GS20 produces a clean, quality wake for boarding or a wave for surfing. Nautique powers its boats with PCM Marine engines, and the Super Air GS20 can be rigged with a 355 hp ZZ5, 400 hp ZR4 or 450 hp ZZ6.

Key Features

• Surf pipe on the transom sends exhaust into the propeller stream and away from the surfer.

• Pop-up ski-pylon option brings the rope’s tow point down, providing better control for skiers and even for tubing.

• Ballast capacity is 1,850 pounds.

• Linc Panoray system includes Ski Assist feature.

• Flight Control tower for boarding tow point.

Nautique Boats - Orlando, Florida; 800-346-2092; nautique.com

© Provided by Boating LOA: 20'0

LOA: 20'0' Beam: 8'6' Fuel Capacity: 46 gal. Dry Weight: 4,975 lb. Seating Capacity: 13 persons (Courtesy Tigé Boats/)

Tigé 20RZX

Tigé‘s 20RZX is heavier and beamier than the typical 20-foot crossover, so it is naturally up to the task of producing big wakes. Because of its dimensions, Tigé is able to build in a 46-gallon fuel capacity and create comfortable seating for up to 13 people. That means plenty of spotters for every session.

The first thing to consider is the 20 RZX’s patented Convex hull, a cathedral-style hull that curves upward at the transom and can produce a slalom-ready wake with no ballast and at tournament skiing speeds—around 34 to 36 mph. When it’s time to wakeboard, the driver can press a button on the in-dash Clear touchscreen to fill up the 3,000 pounds of ballast in a matter of minutes. Use the 11-inch screen to control Tigé‘s TAPS 3 System.

© Provided by Boating Price: Starts at $101,829

Price: Starts at $101,829 (Courtesy Tigé Boats/)

For surfers, the TAPS 3 system is a combination of three extended trim tabs on the transom that can operate independently from one another. These tabs help control three aspects of the boat to optimize the wave to the rider’s liking: pitch, list and yaw. For example, by working the tabs to either side, Tigé drivers can help the boat list to 7 degrees to port or starboard to help shape the wave, rather than adjusting the ballast to either side.

Tigé powers the boat with Raptor engines from Indmar, paired with a V-drive. The power options range from the smaller Raptor 440 up to the Raptor 575, a 6.2L V-8 inboard.

Key Features

• Wider beam and deep freeboard allow for increased fuel capacity and storage space.

• Internal ballast system allows for 3,000 pounds of ballast that can be filled in minutes.

• TAPS 3 system allows the driver to adjust the boat’s pitch, list and yaw to optimize the surf wave.

• Alpha 2 tower is a great design for handling all watersports. Sky store app xbox one.

Tigé Boats - Abilene, Texas; 325-767-7777; tige.com

© Provided by Boating LOA: 21'4Crossover

LOA: 21'4' Beam: 8'2' Fuel Capacity: 51 gal. Dry Weight: 4,800 lb. Seating Capacity: 13 persons (Courtesy MasterCraft Boats/)

MasterCraft XT21

MasterCraft’s XT21 is the longest of the boats we’ve reviewed, although its 8-foot- 2-inch beam and traditional V monohull make it look sleeker than some of the others. With that, it has a large 51-gallon fuel capacity and is capable of holding 14 passengers.

Powered by a 6.0L Ilmor engine made exclusively for MasterCraft, the XT21 tracks true in slalom runs, with a minimal wake when at higher speeds with no ballast. When a wake is needed, MasterCraft equips its boats with its Gen2 Surf System, which is customized for each level of boat in its lineup.

For the XT21, the Gen2 Surf System has an integrated ballast system that provides 2,640 pounds of ballast, with 900-pound tanks placed near the transom to both port and starboard, and a 600-pound tank built under the console’s walk-through to the bow seating. The system also incorporates tabs, which MasterCraft calls shaping devices, to help sculpt and shape the wake or wave to each rider’s preference. All of these aspects can be controlled at the push of a button with the in-dash Murphy touchscreen system.

© Provided by Boating Price: Starts at $99,495

Price: Starts at $99,495 (Courtesy MasterCraft Boats/)

MasterCraft boats are highly customizable in terms of creature comforts, colors and options. One of the coolest options is the Dockstar Handling System, an innovative flanking rudder system that takes away the pain traditionally associated with handling single-engine inboard boats. Opt for it to make maneuvering in tight spots and around the dock or launch ramp a no-sweat situation.

Key Features

• Gen2 Surf System.

• Convertible transom seat.

• Optional Dockstar Handling System makes bringing the boat into the dock, typically a challenge for watersports boats, a real breeze.

• Opt for the ZFT4 or ZFT7 Power Tower.

MasterCraft Boats - Vonore, Tennessee; 423-884-2221; mastercraft.com

© Provided by Boating LOA: 20'11

LOA: 20'11' Beam: 8'6' Fuel Capacity: 45 gal. Dry Weight: 4,950 lb. Seating Capacity: 14 persons (Courtesy Supra Boats/)

Supra SR

Supra’s SR is also a heavier, beamier boat, with a larger 45-gallon fuel capacity and the ability to seat a crew of 14. Supra bills it as its crossover model, suited for both water-ski and wake-sports duties.

Key to the SR, and any Supra boat, is the AutoWake system. AutoWake is a proprietary autopilot system that goes beyond any other—it utilizes onboard sensors to control the boat’s pitch and roll to optimize the shape of wakes and waves. Updated for 2020, AutoWake now includes an auto-leveling feature that utilizes the surf tabs at the transom to keep the boat level, no matter where passengers are seated during surfing, skiing or just cruising around the lake.

The Swell 3.0 Surf system is another engineering feat. This technology deploys inclinometers to measure the boat’s movements, and adjusts the ballast and Supra Launch settings to get the boat aligned with the boat’s pitch and roll to optimize each rider’s preset wake or wave. The system includes vertical stainless-steel blades to each side of the transom, and the aforementioned center tab deployed on the transom just beyond the prop flow.

© Provided by Boating Price: Starts at $120,200Price: Starts at $120,200 (Courtesy Supra Boats/)

AutoWake and Swell 3.0 Surf can be controlled at the dash with the Vision touchscreen control system. The driver will find it easy to use in order to focus on giving the skier, surfer or boarder the ride of his or her life.

The Supra SR is powered by either a 400 or 450 Raptor by Indmar 6.2L V-8 engine that will propel the boat to speeds in the high 30s for skiing or cruising, and can also produce the slow-speed torque necessary for surfing.

Key Features

• FX1 Folding Power Tower is well-equipped for sports and entertainment.

• Wireless phone charging pad at the helm is a nice touch.

• Vision control system at the helm puts every function at your fingertips.

• Swell 3.0 Surf system and AutoWake make prepping for any sport as simple as pushing a button.

• Supra Smart Plate can be adjusted to shape the waves or wakes and to flatten out rough water.

Supra Boats - Maryville, Tennessee; 865-983-9924; supraboats.com

The filter type can be described in several different ways. Low-pass and high-pass filters in two-way crossover networks are often identified by their 'Q'. The Q is the resonance magnification of the filter and it is recognized by the shape of the 'knee' of the amplitude response. Filters with a high Q tend to 'ring' and exhibit poor transient response. Unlike drivers and boxes which use only numerical values for Q, filters are sometimes named after the engineer(s) who first described them. Some examples are shown in the amplitude response graph below.

Filter Types


The filters in three-way crossover networks (and some two-way networks) are often identified as either 'APC' or 'CPC' depending on the way they combine. APC stands for 'All-Pass Crossover' and it refers to those crossover networks whose filters sum to create a flat voltage output. APC networks are generally considered the best choice because they make it possible for the speaker to have a flat on-axis amplitude response. Common APC networks include 1st- and 3rd-order Butterworth filters and 2nd- and 4th-order Linkwitz-Riley filters. CPC stands for 'Constant-Power Crossover' and it refers to those crossovers whose filters sum to provide a flat power response. The power response of a speaker is the total of both its off-axis and on-axis amplitude response. In other words, it is the total acoustical power that is radiated into a space. CPC networks can be beneficial in reverberant environments where the off-axis response is important.

The difference between APC and CPC networks can be understood electrically by a comparison of their input to output voltages. APC networks satisfy the following expression:

[VI] = [VL + VM + VH]

This means the absolute value of the input voltage will equal the absolute value of the sum of the output voltages of each filter at all frequencies. CPC networks satisfy the following:

VI^2 = VL^2 + VM^2 + VH^2

This means that the square of the input voltage will equal the sum of the squares of the output voltages of each filter at all frequencies.

Filter Summary

These generalizations assume that the drivers are properly aligned at the crossover frequency. This means that they are mounted in such a way that the direct sound from each driver arrives at the listener's ear at the same time at the crossover frequency. Another important assumption is that the impedance response of each driver has been equalized so that it appears to be approximately resistive to the crossover network. Also, the sensitivity of the drivers is assumed to have been equalized with an appropriate L-pad.

Finally, the following descriptions assume that all filters in the crossover network are of the same type. If a two-way crossover network has a 4th-order Linkwitz-Riley low-pass filter, it is assumed that it also has a 4th-order Linkwitz-Riley high-pass filter. If you choose to use mismatched filters, you'll have to rely on the your own measurements and experience to determine the results.

10 Best Suv Crossovers

1st-order Filters

Advantages: Can produce minimum phase response (Butterworth only) and a maximally flat amplitude response. Requires the fewest components.

Disadvantages: Its 6 dB/octave slope is often too shallow to prevent modulation distortion, especially at a tweeter's resonance frequency. Achieving minimum phase and a maximally flat amplitude response requires very careful driver alignment and only occurs when the listener is located at exactly the same distance from each driver. It has a 90 degree phase shift which can result in lobing and tilting of the coverage pattern.

Two-Way

1st-order Butterworth: Produces a -3 dB crossover point to achieve a maximally flat amplitude response, minimum phase response and flat power response that qualifies it as both an APC and CPC network. The 90 degree phase shift results in a -15degree tilt in the vertical coverage pattern if the tweeter and woofer are vertically separated by no more than one wavelength at the crossover frequency and if the acoustical depth of the tweeter and woofer are carefully aligned at the crossover frequency. The tilt will increase and lobing can become severe if the drivers are separated by a greater distance or are misaligned. These problems appear as a ripple in the amplitude response. Filter Q = 0.707.

Two-Way & Three-Way

1st-order Solen Split -6 dB: A custom version of the 1st-order Butterworth filter (twoway crossovers) or 1st-order APC filter (three-way crossovers) that uses a -6 dB crossover point to minimize the disadvantages of a crossover network with standard 1st-order Butterworth or APC filters.

Three-Way

Note. 1st-order filters are usually not recommended for three-way crossover networks because their shallow 6 dB/octave slopes do not provide adequate separation. 1st-order APC: Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat amplitude response.

1st-order CPC: (Seldom used.) Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat power response.

2nd-order Filters

Advantages: Can produce a maximally flat amplitude response. Requires relatively few components. Has a 180 degree phase shift which can often be accommodated by reversing the polarity of the tweeter and which produces minimal or no lobing or tilt in the coverage pattern. Is less sensitive to driver misalignment than 1st-order filters.

Disadvantages: Although the 12 dB/octave slope is better than a 1st-order filter, it may still be too shallow to minimize the modulation distortion of many drivers.

Two-Way

2nd-order Bessel: Produces a -5 dB crossover point to achieve a nearly flat (+1 dB) amplitude response. The summed group delay is flat. It has a low sensitivity to driver misalignment and resonance peaks. Filter Q = 0.58.

2nd-order Butterworth: Produces a -3 dB crossover point that sums to a +3 dB amplitude response and a flat power response that qualifies it as a CPC network. It has a medium sensitivity to driver misalignment and resonance peaks. Filter Q = 0.707.

2nd-order Chebychev: (Seldom used.) Produces a 0 dB crossover point to achieve a

+6 dB amplitude response with about ±2 dB of ripple. The summed group delay has a significant peak just below the crossover frequency. It has a medium sensitivity to driver misalignment and resonance peaks. Filter Q = 1 .0.

2nd-order Linkwitz-Riley: (Very popular.) Produces a -6 dB crossover point to achieve a maximally flat amplitude response that qualifies it as an APC network. It has a -3 dB dip in the power response. The summed group delay is flat. It has a medium sensitivity to driver misalignment and resonance peaks. Filter Q = 0.49.

Best Crossover Suv Deals

Three-Way

2nd-order APC: Produces -6 dB crossover points to achieve a flat amplitude response but the power response will have approximately 3 dB of ripple.

2nd-order CPC: (Seldom used.) Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat power response but the amplitude response will have approximately 3 dB of ripple.

3rd-order Filters

Advantages: Can produce nearly flat amplitude response. With an 18 dB/octave slope, it is better able to minimize modulation distortion. Less sensitive to driver misalignment.

Disadvantages: Requires more components. Has a 270 degree phase shift which can result in lobing and tilting of the coverage pattern.

Two-Way

3rd-order Butterworth: (Popular for some D'Appolito mid-tweeter-mid designs.) Produces a -3 dB crossover point to achieve a maximally flat amplitude response and flat power response that qualifies it as both an APC and CPC network. A 270 degree phase shift results in a + 15 degree tilt in the vertical coverage pattern if the tweeter is wired with normal polarity and a -15 degree tilt if the tweeter is wired with reverse polarity. (D'Appolito mid-tweeter-mid designs overcome much of this tilt problem and produce a more symmetrical coverage pattern.) It has better group delay than a 1st- and 2nd-order Butterworth network. Filter Q = 0.707.

Three-Way

3rd-order APC: Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat amplitude response but the power response will have a modest ripple (usually less then 1 dB) that increases slowly as the spread between the two crossover frequencies increases.

Best Crossover Headroom

Best Crossover

3rd-order CPC: (Seldom used.) Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat power response but the amplitude response will have a varying amount of ripple (typically 1 to 3 dB) depending on the spread between the two crossover frequencies.

4th-order Filters

Advantages: Can produce a maximally flat amplitude response. With a 24 dB/octave slope it provides the best isolation between drivers resulting in the least modulation distortion. Has a 360 degree phase shift which results in 'in-phase' response and which promotes minimal or no lobing or tilt in the coverage pattern. Is the least sensitive to driver misalignment.

Disadvantages: Requires the most components. The increased number of inductors can result in substantial insertion loss because of inductor DCR.

Two-Way

4th-order Bessel: Produces a -7 ½ dB crossover point to achieve a nearly flat (-1 ½ dB) amplitude response. The summed group delay produces a moderate bump just below the crossover frequency. Filter Q = 0.58.

4th-order Butterworth: Produces a -3 dB crossover point that sums to a +3 dB amplitude response and flat power response that qualifies it as a CPC network. The summed group delay has a significant peak just below the crossover frequency. Filter Q = 0.707.

4th-order Gaussian: (A seldom used filter that is constructed with an asymmetrical filter topology.) Produces a -6 dB crossover point to achieve a nearly flat amplitude response with moderate ripple. The summed group delay produces a moderate bump just below the crossover frequency.

4th-order Legendre: (A seldom used filter that is constructed with an asymmetrical filter topology.) Produces a -1 dB crossover point that sums to a +5 dB amplitude response with minor ripple. The summed group delay has a significant peak just below the crossover frequency.

4th-order Linear-Phase: (A seldom used filter that is constructed with an asymmetrical filter topology.) Produces a -6 dB crossover point to achieve a nearly flat amplitude response with moderate ripple. The summed group delay produces a moderate bump just below the crossover frequency.

4th-order Linkwitz-Riley: (Very popular. Sometimes called a 'squared Butterworth' filter. Also used for some D'Appolito mid-tweeter-mid designs.) Produces a -6 dB crossover point to achieve a maximally flat amplitude response that qualifies it as an APC network. It has a -3 dB dip in the power response. The summed group delay produces a moderate bump just below the crossover frequency. Filter Q = 0.49.

Three-Way

4th-order APC: Produces -6 dB crossover points to achieve a flat amplitude response but the power response will have approximately 3 dB of ripple.

4th-order CPC: (Seldom used.) Produces -3 dB crossover points to achieve a flat power response but the amplitude response will have approximately 3 dB of ripple.

Source : Xover Pro Harris Technologies

Acknowledgements: I would like to thank Shane Rich (Technical Director of RBH Sound, Inc) for helping with the compilation of this information to serve as a tool in forthcoming technical articles and reviews of loudspeakers.