Brew Gcloud

  

Starting can be daunting. Before you take your first step, there’s a lot to consider, but you can prepare your development environment ahead of time to make your first steps in cloud engineering smooth and productive. In this article, we’ll cover how to set up your development environment to work across cloud providers, multiple languages, and different operating systems.

Building your toolbox

Run gcloud init The installer starts a terminal window and runs the gcloud init command. The default installation does not include the App Engine extensions required to deploy an application using gcloud commands. Homebrew’s package index. Name: Google Cloud SDK Set of tools to manage resources and applications hosted on Google Cloud.

You might have heard of the French culinary term “mise-en-place,” which means laying out all the ingredients and cookware before starting to cook. That’s what we’re going to do here; layout all the accounts, authorizations, and software that you need to be a successful cloud engineer. We are going to need the following:

  • A package manager: Every operating system has a package manager for installing software. Unlike binary installers, a package manager lets you manage all software packages, including updates. Package managers can help resolve dependencies, saving you from frustration.
  • Cloud provider accounts: You can choose to set up one or multiple accounts. The important thing is how to configure credentials in your development environment,
  • Programming languages: You can choose one or many, but they all have different versions and dependencies.
  • Code editor: This is personal preference but make sure that it can perform code completion, error checking, and use enums. These features can be the difference between hitting Tab and searching through online documentation for a function.
  • Pulumi: You can install Pulumi with a package manager and configure

Decisions

Before proceeding, you need to answer three questions:

  • Which operating system to use for building cloud resources: macOS, Windows, or Linux?
  • Which cloud provider are you using? This guide covers AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud.
  • Which programming language will you use? Pulumi supports Node.js (JavaScript and Typescript), Python 3.6 or higher, Golang, and .NET (C#, F#, and VB).

Once you’ve made these choices, you can follow this guide in a choose-your-own-adventure style.

Package manager

Let’s start with the package manager. We’ll use it to install and manage all the software we need, including cloud provider CLIs, programming languages, editors, and Pulumi. Choose your operating system below.

Homebrew is the most popular package manager for macOS. The Command Line Tools (CLT) for XCode is required to install and build Homebrew. Install the XCode Tools first, then install Homebrew from the command line.

If you are uncomfortable with downloading and running an online shell script (with good reason), Homebrew provides an alternate installation method.

Chocolatey is a popular package manager for Windows. It should be installed using an administrative shell.

Make sure that Get-ExecutionPolicy is not restricted.

If the command returns Restricted, we can use Bypass to install Chocolatey with the following command:

To check if it’s installed type:

Linux distributions include a package manager, apt for Debian based distributions or yum for Red Hat-based Linux systems. However, they are primarily used for application and system management.

Homebrew is a popular package manager for utilities, Software Development Kits, and programming tools. Install Homebrew from the command line.

To add Homebrew to your PATH and your bash shell profile script (~/.profile on Debian or ~/.bash_profile on Red Hat), follow the Next steps instructions to install and configure brew. To check if it’s installed, install a package;

Setting up a cloud account

The first task is signing up for an account. Once you have that out of the way, the next steps are installing the CLI and configuring your credentials.

macOS

We’ll use brew to install AWS CLI version 2 and verify if it’s installed by checking the version.

The next step is to create and download your AWS access keys and configure your environment to make them available to both the AWS CLI. To create your access keys, follow these directions for programmatic access.

Pulumi uses the AWS SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

To configure the AWS CLI with your credentials, use aws configure:

This creates a ~/.aws/credentials file used by the AWS CLI to authenticate requests.

We’ll use brew to install Azure CLI and check if it’s installed.

The Azure client is authenticated and ready to use.

Pulumi uses the Azure SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

We’ll use brew to install the Google Cloud SDK and CLI.

Add the gcloud SDK to $PATH in you ~/.bash_profile

Open a new shell or source ~/.profile for Debian or ~/.bash_profile for Red Hat and check to see if it’s installed and pathed.

Authenticate using the gcloud CLI.

Pulumi uses the Google Cloud SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

Windows

We’ll use chocolatey to install AWS CLI version 2 and check if it’s installed. Open a cmd Command Prompt as Administrator:

The install adds the AWS CLI client to the $PATH, so either open a new cmd window or use the refreshenv command to update the window’s environment variables and use the AWS CLI.

The next step is to create and download your AWS access keys and configure your environment to make them available to both the AWS CLI. To create your access keys, follow these directions for programmatic access.

Brew Gcloud 2019

Pulumi uses the AWS SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

To configure the AWS CLI with your credentials, use aws configure:

This will create the ~/.aws/credentials file used by the AWS CLI to authenticate requests.

We’ll use chocolatey to install Azure CLI and check if it’s installed. Open a cmd Command Prompt as Administrator:

The Azure CLI client was added to the path, so either open a new cmd window or use the refreshenv command to update the window’s environment variables. To log into Azure, run the login command, which opens a browser to log into Azure.

The Azure client will open a browser window and prompt you to sign-in to your account. Once signed-in, the Azure CLI is authenticated and ready to use.

Pulumi uses the Azure SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

We’ll use chocolatey to install the Google Cloud SDK and CLI.

The gcloud CLI was added to the path, so either open a new cmd window or use the refreshenv command to update the window’s environment variables. Check to see if gcloud CLI is installed and pathed correctly.

Authenticate using the gcloud CLI

A browser window will open to authenticate your client.

Pulumi uses the Google Cloud SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

Linux

We’ll use brew to install AWS CLI version 2 and check if it’s installed.

The next step is to create and download your AWS access keys and configure your environment to make them available to both the AWS CLI. To create your access keys, follow these directions for programmatic access.

Pulumi uses the AWS SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

To configure the AWS CLI with your credentials, use aws configure:

Brew Install Gcloud

This will create the ~/.aws/credentials file used by the AWS CLI to authenticate requests.

We’ll use brew to install Azure CLI and check if it’s installed.

The Azure client is authenticated and ready to use.

Pulumi uses the Azure SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

We’ll use brew to install the Google Cloud SDK and CLI.

Add the gcloud SDK to $PATH to your ~/.bash_profile or ~/.profile.

Open a new shell or source ~/.profile for Debian or ~/.bash_profile for Red Hat and check to see if it’s installed and pathed.

Authenticate using the gcloud CLI

Pulumi uses the Google Cloud SDK to authenticate requests. Your AWS access keys are never sent to pulumi.com.

Choose a Programming Language

Pulumi supports Node.js (JavaScript and Typescript), Python 3, Golang, and .NET Core (C#, VB, and F#) languages.

Node.js

Use brew to install Node.js for JavaScript and Typescript.

Use chocolatey to install Node.js for JavaScript and Typescript.

Use brew to install Node.js for JavaScript and Typescript.

Python

MacOS includes Python; however, versions shipped before December 2019 have Python 2.7 installed, which is deprecated. Pulumi requires Python 3.6 or higher. Use brew to install Python, which installs it at /usr/bin/local/python3.

In macOS versions with Python 2 installed, calling python uses the 2.7 binary. To ensure that you will always use Python 3, you can add an alias to your .bash_profile.

It is a best practice to create a virtual environment and activate it for a Python project. Pulumi creates a new venv environment when you start a new Project with pulumi new.

You can install Python in several ways, including typing ‘python` in the command prompt, which brings up the Microsoft Store application. In this article, we’ll continue using chocolatey to install Python 3.

It is a best practice to create a virtual environment and activate it for a Python project. Pulumi creates a new venv environment when you start a new Project with pulumi new.

Use brew to install Python3.

Use python3 to call Python, but you can add an alias to your .bash_profile or .profile to use just python to run scripts.

It is a best practice to create a virtual environment and activate it for a Python project. Pulumi creates a new venv environment when you start a new Project with pulumi new.

Golang

Use brew to install golang.

It is a best practice to create a local programming environment and set GOPATH as an environment variable, although it is not required for golang versions after 1.8. Pulumi creates a new local environment and go.mod to work with modules each time you start a new Project with pulumi new.

Use chocolatey to install golang.

It is a best practice to create a local programming environment and set GOPATH as an environment variable, although it is not required for golang versions after 1.16. Pulumi creates a new local environment and go.mod to work with modules each time you start a new Project with pulumi new.

Use brew to install golang.

It is a best practice to create a local programming environment and set GOPATH as an environment variable, although it is not required for golang versions after 1.8. Pulumi creates a new local environment and go.mod to work with modules each time you start a new Project with pulumi new.

.NET

Install .NET with brew, Pulumi requires .NET Core 3.1 or higher.

Install .NET with chocolatey. Pulumi requires .NET Core 3.1 or higher.

Install .NET with brew, Pulumi requires .NET Core 3.1 or higher.

Get a code editor

While knowing how to use vim or similar text editors is a worthwhile skill, you should use a modern code editor. Here’s a non-exhaustive list why you should use a code editor.

  • Quickly navigating to a type
  • Autocompletion when you can’t remember the names of all members by heart
  • Automatic code generation
  • Refactoring
  • Organise imports
  • Warnings as you type.
  • Hovering over something to see the docs
  • Keeping a view of files, errors/warnings/console/unit-tests and source code on the screen
  • Running unit tests from the same window
  • Integrated debugging
  • Integrated source control
  • Navigating to where a compile-time error or run-time exception occurred directly from the error details.

You can use an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) such as Microsoft Visual Studio, Xcode, or any one of JetBrains' language-specific IDEs. Alternatively, you can use a lightweight solution with many of the features of an IDE. Popular code editors include Visual Studio Code, Sublime Text, and Atom.

What is google cloud sdk

You can install some editors with brew.

Install Pulumi

macOS Sierra (10.12) or later is required.

Homebrew

You can install Pulumi through the Homebrew package manager:

This will install the pulumi CLI to the usual place (often /usr/local/bin/pulumi) and add it to your path.

Subsequent updates can be installed in the usual way:

Installation Script

To install, run our installation script:

This will install the pulumi CLI to ~/.pulumi/bin and add it to your path. When it can’t automatically add pulumi to your path, you will be prompted to add it manually.See How to permanently set $PATH on Unix for guidance.

Windows 8 and 10 are supported.

Chocolatey

You can install Pulumi using elevated permissions through the Chocolatey package manager:

This will install the pulumi CLI to the usual place (often $($env:ChocolateyInstall)libpulumi) and generate the shims (usually $($env:ChocolateyInstall)bin) to add Pulumi your path.

Samsung note 4 pc suite windows 10. Subsequent updates can be installed in the usual way:

Gcloud

Verifying your Installation

After installing Pulumi, verify everything is in working order by running the pulumi CLI:

Next steps

Congratulations! You have a fully configured environment, and you’re ready to jump into cloud engineering. You can maintain your development environment using the package manager to add or update your toolset. Your code editor provides a modern development platform that takes advantage of all the advances in software engineering. Your coding experience will be more productive and less frustrating.

What are the next steps? Begin with Pulumi’s Getting Started. You can skip the configuration sections and jump straight into your first project. Once you’re done with your first project, try out example projects on Github. You can start with simple projects using the pulumi CLI, such as deploying a web server on AWS with python.

This command will download the project from Github, create a virtual environment and activate it, and download all the python package dependencies. You’re ready to go and deploy with pulumi up. Want more? How about deploying Kubernetes on Azure with python?

You can use the examples as a starting point for building your cloud infrastructure and add resources documented on Pulumi’s API reference and Guides.

Google Cloud SDK とは

Cloud SDK は Google Cloud Platform 用のツールセットです。gcloud、gsutil、bq などのコマンドライン ツールを利用して、Compute Engine、Cloud Storage、BigQuery をはじめとするプロダクトやサービスにコマンドラインからアクセスできます。このようなツールはインタラクティブに実行することも、自動スクリプトで実行することもできます。

Brew Install Gcloud

brew cask install google-cloud-sdk でインストール

インストールの過程で bash または zsh のユーザー向けに設定方法も表示してくれている。

profile 設定

インストールの過程で表示された設定方法を適用する。

bash の場合は以下を実行する。 .bash_profile や .bashrc などにも追加する。

zsh の場合は以下を実行する。 .zprofile や .zshrc などにも追加する。

これらを実行することで環境変数 PATH の先頭に Google Cloud SDK の実行ファイルのパスが追加される。

Google Cloud SDK のバージョンを確認

インストールした Google Cloud SDK のバージョンを確認する。

Google Cloud SDK には Python 2.7 が必要

Cloud SDK は、Linux、Mac OS X、Windows で動作し、Python 2.7.x を必要とします。Cloud SDK にバンドルされている一部のツールには追加の要件があります。たとえば、Java tools for Google App Engine development には Java 1.7 以降が必要です。

macOS には最初から Python 2 がインストールされていると思われるので別途インストールする必要はない。

最近のバージョンの macOS には、Google Cloud SDK に必要な Python の適切なバージョンが含まれています。Cloud SDK には、リリース番号が Python 2.7.9 以降の Python 2 が必要です。追加の Python インタープリタをインストールする場合、それが Google Cloud SDK のインストールを妨げるものであってはなりません。

Brew Gcloud Pro

注: Cloud SDK バージョン 206.0.0 時点の gcloud CLI には、Python 3.4+ インタープリタを使用して実行するための実験的サポートが含まれています(このサポートの除外や Python インタープリタの構成の詳細については gcloud topic startup を実行します)。他のすべての Cloud SDK ツールには、引き続き Python 2.7 インタープリタが必要です。

Brew Install Gcloud Cli

今回の環境には Python 3.7 もインストールされていたが、Google Cloud SDK の動作には問題がなさそうだった。

参考資料