Github Video In Readme

  

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Just having a 'Contributing' section in your README is a good start. Another approach is to split off your guidelines into their own file (CONTRIBUTING.md).If you use GitHub and have this file, then anyone who creates an issue or opens a pull request will get a link to it.

03 Jul 2017
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  • Video Analytics Serving Getting Started Documentation Reference Guides Related Links Known Issues Video Analytics Serving is a python package and microservice for deploying optimized media analytics pipelines. It supports pipelines defined in GStreamer. or FFmpeg. and provides APIs to discover, start, stop, customize and monitor pipeline execution.

Sometimes you may want to embed a youtube video into your repository’s README.md file. There are several methods such as using youtube’s auto-generated picture, a video screenshot, or an animated gif.

Use youtube’s preview picture

We can use youtube’s auto-generated picture for the video:

Template:

Embed video in github readme

Example:

Which gives you this (using –b-9HrKK6w for VIDEO-ID). But this doesn’t feel like a video. We can do better.

Notice how it’s not completely certain if it’s an image or a video.

Use a video screenshot or .gif

To make it feel more like a video, we can use a video placeholder picture, screenshot, or .gif for our image. First create a directory to hold the screenshot or gif such as doc/screenshot_youtube.PNG then use this format.

Embed Video In Github Readme

Embed video in github readme

Template:

Example:

This method gives us this. If you need a quick fix, this method “tricks” the user into thinking the video is on the README page with a picture. It’s not perfect but it works.

Similarly, you could use an animated .gif instead since they are rendered on Github’s readme.

Template:

Example:

This method is probably the most eye catching but it takes some work to get that .gif file.

Good luck!

Best Github Readme

Github Video In Readme

Open source powers software on a planetary scale: 99% of code is built on it. The rewards and challenges of creating open source are deeply familiar to the maintainers and developers who create it, but they often go unseen by others. We read a lot about the preeminence of software, less so about the communities of people pouring their efforts and passions into it.

This is why we’re launching The ReadME Project, a new space for the community to share their stories, and to learn from each other. Today, and throughout the coming months, you’ll read stories of personal growth, professional challenges, and lessons learned—the journeys you might not see behind projects you probably use every day.

We’re excited and grateful that the first profiles feature Henry Zhu, Samson Goddy, Sonia John, Ovilia Zhang, and Dirk Lemstra. Their stories are live right now, ready for you to explore, and there are so many more to come. Nominate an inspiring developer whose work you’ve been following or unsung contributors that have done great things for your project.

We hope you take something constructive from these personal profiles and merge it with your own story. Open source is incredible, uplifting, and collaborative, but it’s also imperfect. All of us can learn from the creativity, grit, and perseverance of the individuals who build it.

The ReadME Project features the stories of the people behind open source. We want this to be an engaging destination for you, so please send us feedback and contribute your ideas that can inspire and inform all of us. We’ll continue to shine the light on individuals, but you can expect us to experiment with some new projects along the way. We can’t wait to hear what you think!