Power Automate Approval Markdown

  
  1. Markdown In Power Automate Approval Requests
  2. Power Automate Approval Markdown Not Working

Whats up Friends?!FINALLY! I am remaking my most popular video ever! Multi Layered Approvals in the new actions! To view the original go here - https://www.y. You could add the URI code '%0A' between the sentences you want to break line, then use the decodeUriComponent function to decode it, for Example. Add lines between your text with the URI code.%0AThis code your text better and makes it easier to read.

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Power automate approval markdown not working

CRM 2011, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 Workflow - Parallel Wait Branch {Conditions}, MSCRM 2011

Parallel wait conditions provides a powerful way for a particular condition to occur avoiding any custom code.

In a particular scenario, my client wants to follow-up with a lead with the E-mails on random intervals, say after 10-days, then 30-days, then 45-days, then 3-months.

A simple workflow with Timeout process did the trick.

But what about the condition when a reply is received from that lead ? We need to stop the workflow then and there itself.

The Parallel wait branch made the task much easier, one or more conditions can be added parallelly before a step can be taken further.


In my case, if a mail is received then i could make the workflow stop with the status of succeed before processing any further or waiting for the Timeout to complete.

Hope this might help someone to write a powerful workflow and explore the rest options of CRM-Workflows !!!

Power

🙂

Last Friday while checking the Twitter I found a twitter from Jon Levesque asking if someone had a sample on how to took SQL data table results and passed a Markdown-formatted table into an Approval Request. By coincidence, two weeks ago, I was helping a colleague of mine doing something similar, in that case, it was just adding a well-formatted table with the results of an SQL expression to a notification email. Two different but similar scenarios.

To be able to create this simple proof-of-concept you should:

  • Access the Flow portal: https://flow.microsoft.com/ and sign in with your account
  • In flow.microsoft.com, select “My flows” in the top navigation bar, and then select “+ Create from blank” to create a Flow from scratch.
  • On the “Create a flow from blank”, select “Create from blank” to start the process of creating an empty Flow

Because this is a simple POC and it supposed to be a notification email we will be using the Scheduler trigger to start the Flow from time to time. For that you need:

  • On the Flow designer, on the Trigger event enter “Schedule” and select the option “Schedule – Recurrence”
  • For this POC, we want to receive a notification on a daily, so on the Schedule Trigger configuration set the:
    • “Interval” property as “1”
    • And the “Frequency” property has “Day”
  • Add the next step by clicking the “+New step” button and then choose the “Add an action” option
  • On the “Choose an action” window, enter “SQL Server” and select the action “SQL Server – Execute a SQL query”

Note: This can be a different action like, get rows or execute a stored procedure.

  • After you connect to the proper SQL Server and database, on the Execute a SQL query action configuration:
    • On the “query” property, type
  • Add the next step by clicking the “+New step” button and then choose the “Add an action” option
  • On the “Choose an action” window, enter “Variables” and select the action “Variables – Initialize variable”
  • On the Variable action configuration:
    • On the “Name” property, type “lines”
    • On the “Type” property, specify the type as “String”
    • On the “Value” property leave it blank

Note: Initialize variable needs to be performed on Top Level, in other words, outside any cycle operation (Do Until or For Each). Initialize variable inside cycles are not permitted.

  • Add the next step by clicking the “+New step” button and then choose the “Add an action” option
  • On the “Choose an action” window, enter “Variables” and select the action “Variables – Append to string variable”
  • On the Variable action configuration:
    • On the “Name” property, select “lines” variable
    • On the “Value” property type

Note: @{items(‘Apply_to_each’)?[‘Name’]} and @{items(‘Apply_to_each’)?[‘Nacionality’]} are inserted and selected from the list of “Execute a SQL query” action tokens

  • Because we can have multiple rows retrieved from SQL Server, the Flow designer will automatically place this “Variable – Append to string variable” inside a loop that will iterate thru each SQL row.

Now that we have our SQL rows partially well-formatted in a Markdown-formatted table, what we need to do is create our notification/Approval Request email. To do that we need:

  • Add the next step by clicking the “+New step” button and then choose the “Add an action” option
  • On the “Choose an action” window, enter “Office 365 Outlook” and select the action “Office 365 Outlook – Send an email”
  • On the Office 365 Outlook action configuration:
    • On the “To” property, type the email for which you want to send the email
    • On the “Subject” property, type the subject of the email
    • On the “Body” property, type:

Markdown In Power Automate Approval Requests

Note: @{variables(‘lines’)} is inserted and selected from the list of “Variables” tokens

Now the final trick for you to receive this type of email:

instead of this:

On the Office 365 Outlook action configuration you need to:

  • Click on “Show advanced options”.

Power Automate Approval Markdown Not Working

  • And on the “Show advanced options”:
    • On the “Is HTML” property, select “Yes”